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Cisco Systems

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* “A Cisco Systems Inc. executive told a Senate subcommittee Tuesday that comments in an internal document about China’s goal to “combat” a religious group did not reflect the company’s views on censorship. The PowerPoint presentation, which described China’s technology status, included a slide that referred to goals to stop network-related crimes, guarantee the security and services of a public network and “combat ‘Falun Gong’ evil religion and other hostiles” Source: The Associated Press, May 2008 [http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/363911_netfreedom21.html] * “A Cisco Systems Inc. executive told a Senate subcommittee Tuesday that comments in an internal document about China’s goal to “combat” a religious group did not reflect the company’s views on censorship. The PowerPoint presentation, which described China’s technology status, included a slide that referred to goals to stop network-related crimes, guarantee the security and services of a public network and “combat ‘Falun Gong’ evil religion and other hostiles” Source: The Associated Press, May 2008 [http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/363911_netfreedom21.html]
-* "We firmly believe," says company spokesman Ron Piovesan, "that the internet has made countries all over the world more open." But Chinese citizens haven't exactly been able to count on Cisco's help in this respect. Indeed, the company has done exactly the opposite, says Gutmann, reconfiguring its top-selling firewalls and routers to meet the Chinese government's censorship needs. In a study on the internet filtering system in China, the "OpenNet Initiative," a research pool of three North American universities, writes that Cisco products are especially well-suited to helping out the government's monitoring system.” Source: Spiegel Magazine, [http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,375965,00.html]+* "We firmly believe," says company spokesman Ron Piovesan, "that the internet has made countries all over the world more open." But Chinese citizens haven't exactly been able to count on Cisco's help in this respect. Indeed, the company has done exactly the opposite, says Gutmann, reconfiguring its top-selling firewalls and routers to meet the Chinese government's censorship needs. In a study on the internet filtering system in China, the "OpenNet Initiative," a research pool of three North American universities, writes that Cisco products are especially well-suited to helping out the government's monitoring system.” Source: Spiegel Magazine, Sep 2005 [http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,375965,00.html]
* ““We have a very good relationship with U.S. companies like I.B.M., Cisco, H.P., Dell,” said Robin Huang, the chief operating officer of China Public Security. “All of these U.S. companies work with us to build our system together.” The role of American companies in helping Chinese security forces has periodically been controversial in the United States. Executives from Yahoo, Google, Microsoft and Cisco Systems testified in February 2006 at a Congressional hearing called to review whether they had deliberately designed their systems to help the Chinese state muzzle dissidents on the Internet; they denied having done so.” Source: New York Times, August 2007 [http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/12/business/worldbusiness/12security.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&pagewanted=2&adxnnlx=1216496346-JxRuzEfWyIVLTffEEpvrNw] * ““We have a very good relationship with U.S. companies like I.B.M., Cisco, H.P., Dell,” said Robin Huang, the chief operating officer of China Public Security. “All of these U.S. companies work with us to build our system together.” The role of American companies in helping Chinese security forces has periodically been controversial in the United States. Executives from Yahoo, Google, Microsoft and Cisco Systems testified in February 2006 at a Congressional hearing called to review whether they had deliberately designed their systems to help the Chinese state muzzle dissidents on the Internet; they denied having done so.” Source: New York Times, August 2007 [http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/12/business/worldbusiness/12security.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&pagewanted=2&adxnnlx=1216496346-JxRuzEfWyIVLTffEEpvrNw]

Revision as of 00:33, 23 July 2008

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Cisco Systems

170 W. Tasman Dr., Bldg. 10 San Jose CA USA
95134-1706
408-526-4000
http://www.cisco.com
infosec@cisco.com

Type:

Public (NASDAQ: CSCO)

Cisco Systems routes packets and routs competitors with equal efficiency. Dominating the market for IP-based networking equipment, the company provides routers and switches used to direct data, voice, and video traffic. Other products include remote access servers, IP telephony equipment, optical networking components, Internet conferencing systems, set-top boxes, and network service and security systems. It sells its products primarily to large enterprises and telecommunications service providers, but it also markets products designed for small businesses and consumers through its Linksys division.

Contents


Criticism

China Censorship Controversy

  • “A Cisco Systems Inc. executive told a Senate subcommittee Tuesday that comments in an internal document about China’s goal to “combat” a religious group did not reflect the company’s views on censorship. The PowerPoint presentation, which described China’s technology status, included a slide that referred to goals to stop network-related crimes, guarantee the security and services of a public network and “combat ‘Falun Gong’ evil religion and other hostiles” Source: The Associated Press, May 2008 [1]
  • "We firmly believe," says company spokesman Ron Piovesan, "that the internet has made countries all over the world more open." But Chinese citizens haven't exactly been able to count on Cisco's help in this respect. Indeed, the company has done exactly the opposite, says Gutmann, reconfiguring its top-selling firewalls and routers to meet the Chinese government's censorship needs. In a study on the internet filtering system in China, the "OpenNet Initiative," a research pool of three North American universities, writes that Cisco products are especially well-suited to helping out the government's monitoring system.” Source: Spiegel Magazine, Sep 2005 [2]
  • ““We have a very good relationship with U.S. companies like I.B.M., Cisco, H.P., Dell,” said Robin Huang, the chief operating officer of China Public Security. “All of these U.S. companies work with us to build our system together.” The role of American companies in helping Chinese security forces has periodically been controversial in the United States. Executives from Yahoo, Google, Microsoft and Cisco Systems testified in February 2006 at a Congressional hearing called to review whether they had deliberately designed their systems to help the Chinese state muzzle dissidents on the Internet; they denied having done so.” Source: New York Times, August 2007 [3]

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